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Tag: breastfeeding

It’s been almost two months since my last post, and, my god, what a couple of months they were.  Babies are quite something – It’s quite incomprehensible how much of a change having this little bundle of joy can have on your life. Looking at this scientifically, their effect is clearly inversely proportional to their size – massive disruption to normal life when they’re tiny (viz – now), and increasing “normal” function as time goes on and as baby gets all nice, chubby and big. Or am I being optimistic??

Now, considering my pre-birth blog was titled “contemplating diapers”, I can confidently state that I clearly did not contemplate hard enough!  Your child’s birth is a watershed event, even beyond what people keep telling you (“it will change your life”!) – at this point this is manifest much more in a practical sense than a mental one. One aspect of this is that having a two month old baby does not necessarily “register” – we don’t really feel as “parents” yet – rather you find yourself subdued to the whims of a simplified hybrid of you and your partner (“she has your eyes”; “she has your feet”; “she has your gas” – the latter being said to me , of course), and your whole life is suddenly taken over by the requirements of taking care of her. So it just happens. You get sucked along – I guess the realization comes afterwards.

While things for me have continued in some part unchanged – I still go to work every day, though come back earlier, for Anna life has completely been paused – a never-ending groundhog day cycle of sleep-feed-nappy-sleep which goes on and on. While we have tried to go out, have friends over, and are planning to go to Paris for the new year tomorrow, I do feel that it’s very hard for her. On a positive note, we have been interviewing nannies and it looks like we will be able to find someone, so Anna will be able to go back to work with reasonable confidence in February.

Of course, we had both grandmothers over for two week-stints – which was really helpful for us as the first month was  real boot camp experience. Let’s see: you don’t sleep much, run around a lot because someone is screaming at you, are lucky to have time to go to the loo, have to obey the needs of someone with the brain capacity of a baby (my sergeant major was a doozy) At least the food is better here!. I mean, who knew there were so many different forms of baby cries? The long nights, the steep learning curve, the support within such a new, demanding situation would be so much tougher had the grannies not been here! Of course, they got some quality granddaughter time and so a positive overall cost/benefit ratio 😎

Another aspect worth mentioning is the time factor – it suddenly goes by so quickly….days and weeks fly by, each one centered around what the baby has done, how has she slept/ate/smiled today…it’s quite amazing when you think of it. The days are packed, always a lot to do around her little highness, but as a whole you suddenly catch yourself and she’s already one month…six weeks…two months old…heck, we’ll be sending her off to college in no time.

The good news is the little lady is growing well, already almost 5 kgs of cuteness. Apparently her head is quite big (90th percentile), but what do you expect with two geeks as parents. She’s definitely eating well – she gets that from me, of course.

Following are 10 off-hand tips: please add any more you have in comments.

10.  You spend the first 24 hours worried about whether the baby is ok when she’s sleeping. You spend months afterwards worrying that she’s going to wake up.

9. The phrase “quiet, you’ll wake the baby” is, as much as you don’t want to be using or hearing it, one that you’re going to use and hear a lot.

8. Sleep. Eat. Poop. Cry. Eat. Cry. Sleep. Poop. Cry. Sleep. Eat. Poop. That is the schedule for your baby’s life in the first few months, and by proxy yours as well. If the sleeping durations aren’t long, well, buddy, you’re royally screwed.

7. Breastfeeding is far from being a simple thing. Very important, complicated and can cause total anguish till the mother and baby get it.

6. Grandparents call. A lot. That’s what they do.

5. The system shock and lifestyle change after birth is huge: support your wife or you’ll both have a horrible time.

4. Quiet moments, taken for granted before, are suddenly immensely prized assets.

3. If you’ve not had it for a while, you’re going to have to get used to frozen food. If that’s all you’ve been eating beforehand, well, you’re a slob but will suffer less.

2. Babies may look dumb, but they require a huge repertoire of movements, songs, shakes, positions and sounds to calm them down. Like some hoighty-toighty connoisseur, if you don’t get it exactly right – forget it, you’ll be screamed at.

1. Sleep is a luxury. Forget all luxuries.